Do you like retro games, but don’t mind emulation? Well this might be the device for you. Imagine if you could play all of your old games on just one device. NES, Genesis, GameBoy, maybe even the N64 and PS1? Not only that, but what if you could have more control? Save sates? Change the aspect ratio? Maybe you’d like to add scanlines too? Well you can on the RetroPie. An OS of sorts that can be installed on the cheap computer called Raspberry Pi. We are specifically using the Raspberry Pi 3 model for this review for maximum power!

This is an in-depth review for the RetroPie looking over most of the emulation on the RetroPie and how games run on them. I even looked into ones for the Sega CD and Famicom Disk System. If you’d like to see specific emulators then feel free to use the bookmarks below to skip to emulators you most care about!

Bookmarks:
Start of Review 4:41
NES 6:10
Master System 8:42
Game Boy 9:23
Game Boy Color 10:40
PC Engine 11:18
Sega Genesis 12:13
Game Gear 13:20
Super Nintendo 14:09
Sega 32x 14:51
Game Boy Advance 15:14
Nintendo 64 17:08
Atari/MSX 19:06
Famicom Disk System 22:12
Neo-Geo 23:49
Sega CD 24:41
PC Engine CD 25:37
PlayStation 1 26:27

Best Info on the RetroPie:
https://github.com/retropie/retropie-setup/wiki

If you’d like me to go over installation or cover more options on the RetroPie, please leave a comment and ask for it!

*How to edit RetroPie Config file*

On the emulation station screen, with a keyboard plugged in press the F4 Key or CTR-F4. This will send you to a screen with little text art of an Atari controller. From here you need to type in perfectly. sudo nano /boot/config.txt Then press enter and it will bring you to a bunch of text and code. These are important to how your output works so from here you will fix your specific problem. For me, I want to change some files to make my pie look and work better. First I want to uncomment the overscan text. Uncommenting basically means getting rid of the “#”. By doing this you are changing the Pi from treating this as normal text to actually code. For the overscan we are getting rid of the black border around the screen, which I’m sure no one wants. I also want to change the resolution of my pi. This can sometimes help emulation speed, but if you are using the Pi3 it will probably only help with 3D games. Your system should automatically be doing 1080P 60hz. I want 720P and 60HZ so I uncommented HDMI Group 1 and HDMI mode 1. The numbers in front of group and mode will be how you change resolution. Look up a list of resolutions for the HDMI group and mode to find one suitable to you. I want to keep Group 1, but change Mode to 4 for my resolution. Then press ctrl X to leave, Y to save the file. Then press enter to overwrite the config.txt file. Then type in sudo reboot and enter to reboot your system. And from here hopefully all your problems or needs are fixed. If not make sure you typed in everything right or didn’t add anything in the wrong place.

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One-upping the NES Classic Edition with the Raspberry Pi 3 and RetroPie

NES Classic is no more, but fortunately economical hobbyist boards are great for basic projects.

Last November, Nintendo pleasantly surprised everyone by returning to its origins and releasing the NES Classic. The delightful emulator/nostalgia-fest started unanticipated requirement, including near-instant supply issues and 200-percent-plus markups in secondary markets. So in December of 2016, we made a decision to build our own version preferably. Since Nintendo bizarrely announced that it won’t be making any more of the hard-to-find mini consoles recently, we’re re-running this piece to help those of you with a DIY streak again build your own. Hardware recommendations have been updated to reflect current availability and pricing for April 2017.

Discover more https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2017/04/one-upping-the-nes-classic-edition-with-the-raspberry-pi-3-and-retropie/

Meet MintyPi 2.0: Raspberry Pi Gaming Emulator Stuffed Into Tiny Mint Tin Box

A YouTuber and creator has revealed mintyPi 2.0, a project that transforms a normal mint tin box into a easily transportable video game console.

MintyPi 2.0, powered by the Raspberry Pi tiny computer, is the second attempt at the project, bringing with it a couple of revisions as opposed to original mintyPi.

Discover more http://www.techtimes.com/articles/204662/20170411/meet-mintypi-2-0-raspberry-pi-video-game-emulator-packed-into-tiny-mint-tin-box.htm

JB Hi-Fi Just Received The Mother Lode Of Nintendo Classic Minis

Christmas 2016 will eternally be kept in mind as the year people went legit bananas for a vintage NES console. The thing was a piece of plastic that just played 30 games from the 8-bit era – but nostalgia is a effective thing. So powerful that demand totally exceeded supply, causing crashed websites, exhausted stock and a huge number of empty-handed shoppers.

For the people still on a Zelda-like quest to obtain this mythological gizmo, we’ve got some fantastic news: the Nintendo NES Classic Edition is currently accessible in JB Hi-FI stores, Across australia. Hurrah!

Discover more at https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2017/04/jb-hi-fi-just-received-a-butt-load-of-nintendo-mini-nes-consoles/